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A Quick Peak Into The First Few Chapters

In the full book, we look at numerous different HIIT workouts and discuss a lot of the science and theory behind how they work. Hopefully, it will inspire you to start getting more creative with your workouts and to come up with some really challenging routines that will increase your strength, your fitness and your physique.
  • Chapter 1

    Chapter 1: Cardio Training, Then and Now

    If you want to build muscle, then you need to cause muscle damage and metabolic stress. By lifting weights, you can cause a build-up of damage and this will provide precisely the stimulation you need to trigger muscle growth during rest.
    To lose fat, improve your fitness and get better health though, you need to use cardiovascular training.
    Cardiovascular training is any type of training that involves exerting yourself for an extended period of time. Very often this will mean running long distances, with jogging being perhaps the most popular form of cardio training. Not far behind though are swimming, cycling, skipping, rowing and others.
    Traditionally, this kind of cardiovascular training has been ‘steady state’. That means that you put on your running shoes, you step out of the door and you run for about 40-60 minutes. It’s steady state because you are maintaining a steady level of exertion throughout the course of the exercise. In this case you are jogging at a set pace and then maintaining that pace.
    For a long time, this was thought to be the very best way to burn the maximum number of calories and to improve fitness – and there was good theory behind why this should be the case. Specifically, it was thought that there was an optimal ‘fat burning zone’ and that this could be found at roughly 70% of your maximum heartrate.

  • Chapter 2

    Chapter 2: Understanding Your Body

    Lt’s first consider how the body gets energy and manages that energy during exertion.
    First, in order to exercise, the body needs energy. This energy comes from a source known as ATP or Adenosine Triphosphate which is described in scientific circles as the ‘energy currency of life’. This substance is a nucleotide made up of three phosphagen molecules, bonded together by a powerful force. That’s what the name literally means tri- meaning three, phosphate – meaning phosphagen.
    All types of energy in the body are ultimately converted into ATP, so when you eat a big cake, the sugar and glucose will ultimately need to be converted into this molecule before it can be of any use to your muscles or your cells. In real terms, any one ‘mole’ of ATP energy will provide 7.3 calories. It would take just over 190 micromoles to move your index finger enough to click a mouse button on a computer and this would equate to around 1.42 calories!
    The power in this substance however doesn’t come from the phosphagen itself, but from the powerful bonds that bind it together, and it’s when these bonds break that they unleash the energy that the body can utilise. An athlete needs to be able to supply their muscles with a lot of ATP then in order to perform the necessary movements for running or weightlifting – and there are three ways in which they can do this.

  • Chapter 3

    Chapter 3: How to Start HIIT Training With Running

    So now you know the science, it’s time to start putting that theory into practice!
    The great news is that HIIT training really is just as easy as it sounds and simply involves alternating between periods of high exertion and relatively low intensity exercise. There are a few caveats however and it is important to approach this in a sensible and structured way in order to avoid injury or disappointment.
    Most people will begin their HIIT with running as this is a very straightforward form of cardio training that doesn’t require access to any specialist tools and that anyone can understand and use.
    There are countless HIIT protocols however and these vary in length and intensity. The key thing to recognize here is that high intensity training of any kind can be highly dangerous if you have never done it before, if you’re very overweight or if you’re in very poor physical health. It’s also dangerous if you have any pre-existing heart conditions.
    In short, you need basic heart strength before you start pushing it to 100%. Thus, it is a good idea to build up at least a basic level of fitness before you start your HIIT training. If you’re still gasping for breath whenever you ascend the stairs, then you’re not ready for HIIT.

  • Chapter 4

    Chapter 4: Tips for Better HIIT Results

    When performing the sprints, remember that it doesn’t actually matter how fast you are going as long as you are maxing out your potential. In other words, there’s a good chance that you are going to find yourself slowing down somewhat as you reach the later stages of your routine and you shouldn’t worry if that happens.
    Wearing a fitness tracker or running watch can help you with this. Something like the Garmin Vivoactive will provide the best of both worlds here by acting as a fitness tracker throughout the day (measuring your heartrate and your steps etc.) but acting as a running watch during training and letting you monitor your route and your metrics.
    Your maximum heartrate is something you can calculate quite easily. Simply go for a sprint or engage in other activity with maximum effort. Monitor your heartrate and you should find that it never goes beyond a certain point. This point is your max heartrate and it’s what you should be aiming to hit whenever you perform the high intensity portions of these workouts. The speed is less important.And of course you can also use this to work out 70% of your MHR, which should be your fat burning zone.

Chapter 1

Chapter 1: Cardio Training, Then and Now

If you want to build muscle, then you need to cause muscle damage and metabolic stress. By lifting weights, you can cause a build-up of damage and this will provide precisely the stimulation you need to trigger muscle growth during rest.
To lose fat, improve your fitness and get better health though, you need to use cardiovascular training.
Cardiovascular training is any type of training that involves exerting yourself for an extended period of time. Very often this will mean running long distances, with jogging being perhaps the most popular form of cardio training. Not far behind though are swimming, cycling, skipping, rowing and others.
Traditionally, this kind of cardiovascular training has been ‘steady state’. That means that you put on your running shoes, you step out of the door and you run for about 40-60 minutes. It’s steady state because you are maintaining a steady level of exertion throughout the course of the exercise. In this case you are jogging at a set pace and then maintaining that pace.
For a long time, this was thought to be the very best way to burn the maximum number of calories and to improve fitness – and there was good theory behind why this should be the case. Specifically, it was thought that there was an optimal ‘fat burning zone’ and that this could be found at roughly 70% of your maximum heartrate.

Chapter 2

Chapter 2: Understanding Your Body

Lt’s first consider how the body gets energy and manages that energy during exertion.
First, in order to exercise, the body needs energy. This energy comes from a source known as ATP or Adenosine Triphosphate which is described in scientific circles as the ‘energy currency of life’. This substance is a nucleotide made up of three phosphagen molecules, bonded together by a powerful force. That’s what the name literally means tri- meaning three, phosphate – meaning phosphagen.
All types of energy in the body are ultimately converted into ATP, so when you eat a big cake, the sugar and glucose will ultimately need to be converted into this molecule before it can be of any use to your muscles or your cells. In real terms, any one ‘mole’ of ATP energy will provide 7.3 calories. It would take just over 190 micromoles to move your index finger enough to click a mouse button on a computer and this would equate to around 1.42 calories!
The power in this substance however doesn’t come from the phosphagen itself, but from the powerful bonds that bind it together, and it’s when these bonds break that they unleash the energy that the body can utilise. An athlete needs to be able to supply their muscles with a lot of ATP then in order to perform the necessary movements for running or weightlifting – and there are three ways in which they can do this.

Chapter 3

Chapter 3: How to Start HIIT Training With Running

So now you know the science, it’s time to start putting that theory into practice!
The great news is that HIIT training really is just as easy as it sounds and simply involves alternating between periods of high exertion and relatively low intensity exercise. There are a few caveats however and it is important to approach this in a sensible and structured way in order to avoid injury or disappointment.
Most people will begin their HIIT with running as this is a very straightforward form of cardio training that doesn’t require access to any specialist tools and that anyone can understand and use.
There are countless HIIT protocols however and these vary in length and intensity. The key thing to recognize here is that high intensity training of any kind can be highly dangerous if you have never done it before, if you’re very overweight or if you’re in very poor physical health. It’s also dangerous if you have any pre-existing heart conditions.
In short, you need basic heart strength before you start pushing it to 100%. Thus, it is a good idea to build up at least a basic level of fitness before you start your HIIT training. If you’re still gasping for breath whenever you ascend the stairs, then you’re not ready for HIIT.

Chapter 4

Chapter 4: Tips for Better HIIT Results

When performing the sprints, remember that it doesn’t actually matter how fast you are going as long as you are maxing out your potential. In other words, there’s a good chance that you are going to find yourself slowing down somewhat as you reach the later stages of your routine and you shouldn’t worry if that happens.
Wearing a fitness tracker or running watch can help you with this. Something like the Garmin Vivoactive will provide the best of both worlds here by acting as a fitness tracker throughout the day (measuring your heartrate and your steps etc.) but acting as a running watch during training and letting you monitor your route and your metrics.
Your maximum heartrate is something you can calculate quite easily. Simply go for a sprint or engage in other activity with maximum effort. Monitor your heartrate and you should find that it never goes beyond a certain point. This point is your max heartrate and it’s what you should be aiming to hit whenever you perform the high intensity portions of these workouts. The speed is less important.And of course you can also use this to work out 70% of your MHR, which should be your fat burning zone.